Sibelius didn’t expect lengthy Obamacare opposition

English: Kathleen Sebelius speaking after her ...

Kathleen Sebelius speaking after her official nomination as Secretary of Health and Human Services. President Barack Obama is standing behind Sebelius (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By Scott Malone

BOSTON, April 8 (Reuters) – The top White House adviser on health care said on Monday she did not anticipate how lengthy and persistent the political opposition would be to healthcare reform – U.S. President Barack Obama’s signature domestic legislative achievement.

The administration had not anticipated opposition to the Affordable Care Act of 2010, nicknamed “Obamacare,” would drag on years after the law’s passage, said Kathleen Sebelius, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services.

Despite its goal to provide health coverage to more than 30 million uninsured Americans and improve the quality of medical care delivered across the country, many voters have balked over concerns the law will raise healthcare costs and increase government involvement in their personal decisions.

“The politics has been relentless and that continues,” Sebelius said. “There was some hope that once the Supreme Court ruled in July and then once an election occurred there would be a sense that, ‘This is the law of the land, let’s get on board, let’s make this work.’ And yet we will find ourselves having state by state political battles.”

One factor that contributed to the law’s unpopularity for a large segment of the American public is the fact that its benefits have taken several years to impact people directly. Only in 2014 will many of its broadest benefits take effect, extending health coverage to millions more people.

At the same time, Republican governors and legislatures in states including Texas, Louisiana and South Carolina have refused to set up state-run exchanges where individuals would be able to buy insurance and have rejected the law’s provision to allow more low-income people to enroll in Medicaid insurance.

“It is very difficult when people live in a state where there is a daily declaration, ‘We will not participate in the law,’ for them to figure out whether they are going to benefit,” Sebelius said at an event at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, presented in collaboration with Reuters.

Opponents of Medicaid expansion have argued that states could find themselves saddled with untenable financial burdens if the federal government later cut back its funding to the program.

Loudest among them has been the voice of Texas’ Republican Governor Rick Perry, who has described the Medicaid program as “a broken system.”

Other prominent Republicans have sought to compromise – in Florida, Governor Rick Scott has sought, so far unsuccessfully to persuade his legislative colleagues to accept the Medicaid expansion.

The law also faces continued opposition from corners of the $2.8 trillion U.S. healthcare industry.

Sebelius is one of a handful of members of Obama’s cabinet to stay on for the president’s second term in office.

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta
Cancer Defeated Publications - Natural Cancer Remedies

Recommended For You

Working in an ER in Liberia: A physician shares his story

In June 2014, the first patient with Ebola arrived at Liberia’s county hospital, Redemption. As tensions grew around the city of Monrovia, administrators at JFK Hospital began to devise plans for handling patients with suspected Ebola. Officials from the CDC then came and gave us lectures. They discussed prevention of spreading and what our plans would be in the event of a potential outbreak. Before that moment, there were no clear plans for what to do if a patient presented with symptoms of Ebola. No plans for isolation. No plans for treatment. To make matters worse, the scarcity of gowns, gloves, and personal protective attire presented a big problem.

At that point, we never imagined that Ebola would become so deadly and devastate a country so quickly.

Continue reading …

Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how.


8 tips to survive the marathon of a physician career

Many physicians are discouraged by the state of medical practice in 2014. Maintaining job satisfaction and well-being for the duration of a decades-long medical career can be as daunting as completing an uphill marathon. In addition to keeping up with the explosion of medical knowledge and maintaining certification in your specialty, what concrete practices can you adopt to insure that you will make it to the finish line in good form? Consider these strategies, all beginning with the letter “M.”

Continue reading …

Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how.


iPads detect early signs of glaucoma in Nepal eye screening

(American Academy of Ophthalmology) Using a tablet screening app could prove to be an effective method to aid in the effort to reduce the incidence of avoidable blindness in populations at high-risk for glaucoma with limited access to health care, according to a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Ebola worries end for dozens on U.S. watch lists

DALLAS (Reuters) – Weeks of worries about a possible Ebola infection ended for dozens of people on watch lists in the United States on Monday but scores were still being monitored after potential exposure to the virus, Texas health officials said.

Drugmaker Valeant reports better-than-expected profit

(Reuters) – Canada’s Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc , embroiled in a bitter fight to take over Botox-maker Allergan Inc , posted a better-than-expected quarterly profit, helped by strong sales in all its markets.

50 pounds lost for 50th reunion

In January, Carol Highsmith, 68, began a journey of threes. She had three milestones of 50 that she planned to reach by following three simple rules:

Ebola: An epic, epidemic overreaction

If we really need something to worry about, worry about getting a flu shot — not Ebola. And yet, the disproportionate hysteria over Ebola multiplies contagiously.

Useful Information

Leave a Reply